COVID-19

A transgenic mouse at the Jackson Laboratory.
Photo courtesy of Jackson Laboratory

Hundreds of COVID-19 vaccines are in development across the world, including at Texas Tech University. After what they consider a promising start, they are moving on to testing it on animals. And for this they need small mammals - but not any small animal. For this particular research, they need “transgenic” mice.

Dr. Harvinder Gill leads the team. He’s an associate professor of chemical engineering. “We’ve found there’s actually a really good antibody response in mice,” he said regarding results of their first round of testing.
 

105 new COVID-19 cases Tuesday, numbers remain flat

Jul 28, 2020

COVID-19 data points remained steady Tuesday. 

The City of Lubbock reported 105 newly-confirmed cases of the virus, and 136 recoveries. Three more people have died from complications of the disease. 

Data shows 110 patients were hospitalized Tuesday, with 53 patients receiving intensive care. Hospitalizations have stayed between 100 and about 110 since the middle of July. 

Exposure to a known case continues to be the most common way people contract COVID-19. 

From the City of Lubbock: 

Daughter documenting talks with mother in nursing home

Jul 28, 2020
Photo provided by Jerry Montgomery

 “July 18, 2020. ‘When are you coming to see me?’  ‘I can’t come see you because of the virus that’s going around,’ I told her, again. ‘I’ll be there when they let me come through the door.’ ‘I wish you could walk through the door any minute,’ she said.”  

 

City reports large jump in COVID-19 recoveries

Jul 24, 2020

The City of Lubbock reported the highest number of COVID-19 recoveries in a single day since the local beginning of the pandemic in mid-March. 

From the City of Lubbock: 

As of 4:00 p.m. on Friday, July 24, 2020, the City of Lubbock confirmed 389 recoveries and 82 new cases of Coronavirus (COVID-19). The total number of cases in Lubbock County is 4,962: 1,971 active, 2,923 listed as recovered and 68 deaths. 

Pixabay

When active cases of COVID-19 started creeping up in June, most newly-infected people were under age 30 and experienced mild symptoms of the respiratory illness. Lubbock Health Authority Dr. Ron Cook was already worrying about a different age group.  

 

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